NEW Location

Jacaranda Medical Centre Alstonville

13 Commercial Road, Alstonville,

NSW, Australia 2477

Contact Dr Anne Malatt

Phone 02 6687 2433
reception@doctorannemalatt.com.au

Dr Malatt consults in her rooms at, Jacaranda Medical Centre Alstonville on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. She operates in Lismore on Wednesdays.

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POSTERIOR VITREOUS DETACHMENT

What is the vitreous?

The inside of the eye is filled with a clear gel, called the vitreous.

The vitreous is encased in a fibrous sac, and the posterior face of this is attached to the retina, the nerve tissue which lines the inside of the eye.

As we age, the vitreous gel liquefies, the proteins in it clump together, and the whole thing shrinks.

What is a posterior vitreous detachment?

As the vitreous body shrinks, the posterior vitreous face pulls away from the lining of the eye (the retina) . We call this a posterior vitreous detachment. This is a very common event. Sometimes this happens gently, and causes no symptoms at all.

What are floaters?

The proteins that clump together can be seen floating around in the liquid gel, and we see these as black or clear floaters.

When the vitreous face pulls free, the connective tissue that was attached around the optic nerve and along the blood vessels is now floating in front of the retina and may appear as shapes or cobweb-like strands in the vision.

Occasionally, when the vitreous face pulls loose, it can pull a hole in a blood vessel, causing blood cells to leak out, which we see as a shower of black spots.

What are flashing lights?

Sometimes the vitreous pulls on the retina, causing flashing lights, which we see like lightning out of the corner of the eye.

What is a retinal detachment?

Rarely, when the vitreous face pulls loose, it can tear a hole in the retina, allowing fluid to leak in and under the retina, lifting it off and causing a retinal detachment. This appears as a curtain or a veil coming down over the vision, or as loss of vision.

If you develop flashing lights, we need to check the retina to see if you have a retinal tear. If we pick this up early, it can be sealed off with laser.

If you wait until the retina detaches, it requires a major operation to fix it, and there is a risk of permanent loss of vision in that eye.

Please Contact the Clinic if you would like to know more.